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Try something different – change your angle

I try to practice what I preach. To improve almost any picture, try changing your angle. Generally speaking, interesting images are shot from an angle that we wouldn’t ordinarily view from.

Over the last few days, I have had a few opportunities to try things differently.

The first of those situations was a track and field meet. I find it easier to shoot the field events since I don’t have a super-telephoto lens.

I made my way to the long jump area. The typical photo we are exposed to with long jump is straight on as they land in the sand pit. It usually is very visually appealing. Instead of doing that, I went to the side of the sand pit just past the end of the runway. I got as low as I could, literally having my camera on the ground.

New Castle senior Thatcher Thomas competes in the long jump Thursday afternoon. Thomas jumped 19 feet and 9 inches, securing his victory in the event. (C-T photos Max Gersh)

New Castle senior Thatcher Thomas competes in the long jump Thursday afternoon. Thomas jumped 19 feet and 9 inches, securing his victory in the event. (C-T photos Max Gersh)

This is by no means an original idea. It just shows long jump in a way it isn’t ordinarily portrayed.

It also makes you wonder what is going on in the background with the guy in the hoodie! Albeit it was 45 degrees out, give or take.

For my next assignment, I had to photograph mobs of first graders on a farm. Often times, they move so sporadically, it is hard to get a nice composition. When I saw a group standing around the pig display, I worked the scene until they left.

First, I got low to the ground and shot through the bars of the pig pen.

First-grade students from Blue River Valley Elementary School look at a pig display early Friday afternoon on the Trennepohl Farms in Middletown. (C-T photo Max Gersh)

First-grade students from Blue River Valley Elementary School look at a pig display early Friday afternoon on the Trennepohl Farms in Middletown. (C-T photo Max Gersh)

While I was happy with this photo, I wanted to show more of the pen and more of the kids. I took out my fisheye lens – a lens I don’t use too often – and reached over the rail and put the camera very low to the ground. To fire my camera this way, I was holding it upside-down.

First-grade students from Blue River Valley Elementary School look at a pig display early Friday afternoon on the Trennepohl Farms in Middletown. (C-T photo Max Gersh)

First-grade students from Blue River Valley Elementary School look at a pig display early Friday afternoon on the Trennepohl Farms in Middletown. (C-T photo Max Gersh)

My latest assingment was to shoot a baseball game for all alumni of the high school that played baseball. When I arrived, I found out that there would be a home run derby before the game. I went back to my car to get equipment to set up a low angle remote right at home plate. Again, I used my fisheye lens.

Rick Purvis swings during the New Castle baseball alumni home run derby Saturday afternoon. Purvis graduated in 1998 and scored 12 home runs during his career with the Trojans. (C-T photo Max Gersh)

Rick Purvis swings during the New Castle baseball alumni home run derby Saturday afternoon. Purvis graduated in 1998 and scored 12 home runs during his career with the Trojans. (C-T photo Max Gersh)

There was only one close call where my camera almost took a hit.

Next time you’re out taking pictures, drop to a knee or stand on a chair. It helps spice up a boring situation every time.

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