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Interior design of interior designers

I had never thought about how interior designers stylize their own home. I found out first hand back in January when I visited two designers in one day.

My first stop was at the home of Edwin Massie.

Edwin Massie in his home. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Edwin Massie in his home. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I had two primary objectives while at the homes of theses designers – capture the essence of their home design and make a portrait of them in their element.

Faux ostrich eggs line the shelve in the dining room of Edwin Massie. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Faux ostrich eggs line the shelve in the dining room of Edwin Massie. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The sitting room in the home of interior designer nEdwin Massie icludes  a life size metal human designed by a local artist. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The sitting room in the home of interior designer nEdwin Massie icludes a life size metal human designed by a local artist. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One of the bathrooms proved to be very difficult to photograph. The entire design was very cool but the contrasty lighting and tight quarters made it hard to show everything. I ended up using a 14mm lens and playing with the reflections to show the entire scene.

The dragon, one of Edwin Massie's favorite pieces, sits in his first floor bathroom. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The dragon, one of Edwin Massie's favorite pieces, sits in his first floor bathroom. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I left Edwin Massie’s house wanting him to overhaul my home. I loved his style and use of international antiques.

I then moved on to the home of Ken Stuckenschneider, who had a very different design style.

Ken Stuckenschneider and his Golden Retriever, Brooklyn. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ken Stuckenschneider and his Golden Retriever, Brooklyn. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Brooklyn, his dog, was very excited to see me and nearly ripped my camera off my neck. Luckily, my camera strap (and my neck) held.

In the living room at the home of Ken Stuckenschneider. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the living room at the home of Ken Stuckenschneider. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the guest bed room at the home of Ken Stuckenschneider. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the guest bed room at the home of Ken Stuckenschneider. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A light switch and candle stick on the wall in the dining room at Ken Stuckenschneider's home. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A light switch and candle stick on the wall in the dining room at Ken Stuckenschneider's home. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

On top of a mirror In Ken Stuckenschneider's daughter, India, 3, bedroom. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

On top of a mirror In Ken Stuckenschneider's daughter, India, 3, bedroom. ©2009 Max Gersh | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It amazed me how much both of there homes felt like I was shopping at a high end furniture store. Every room felt like it had a theme. There was a perfect balance of design and blank space.

So yes. It is true. These guys do indeed practice what they preach. If their home design at all reflects what they could do for a client, I would hire either one in a heartbeat.

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